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Nigeria

Hydropower

Hydroelectric Capacity in Nigeria

For the most recent data and over 120 statistics on market and business conditions, download the

Factsheet  Hydroelectric Power : Nigeria factsheet.

 

The relevance of hydroelectric power to the energy mix, 2012

● Initial hydroelectric capacity :1,938 MW
● Added hydroelectric capacity :102 MW
● Final installed hydroelectric capacity :2,040 MW

● Hydroelectricity as % of total installed capacity :

33.94%
● Hydroelectricity as % of total renewable capacity :99.51%

 

% Total Installed Capacity

% Installed Renewable Capacity



A Global and Regional Perspective

INSTALLED HYDROELECTRIC CAPACITY (2012)
● World rank :#54 (behind Taiwan, ahead of Iceland)
● Percent share of World :0.21%
● Relative to #1 market in World :122.1 times smaller

● Regional rank :

#6 (behind Sudan, ahead of Morocco)
● Percent share of Africa :7.29%
● Relative to #1 market in Africa :2.3 times smaller

ADDED HYDROELECTRIC CAPACITY (2012)
● World rank :#15
● Percent share of World :0.38%

● Regional rank :

#3
● Percent share of Africa :5.12%

 

For electricity production, consumption, import and distribution loss data, download the

Factsheet  Hydroelectric Power : Nigeria factsheet.

 

Nigeria compared to Top 10 markets worldwide for Hydroelectric Power Capacity

Hydroelectric Growth Trends

● Percent growth on 2011 :5.26%
● 10 year compound annual growth rate :0.51% (growth in 1 out of the last 10 years)

 

The chart below shows the respective short (1 year) and long (10 year) term growth rates for each of the renewable sectors in Nigeria.  Bubble sizes indicate the relative size of each sector in terms of installed capacity.

Growth Rates by Sector

X-axis = 1 year growth in percent (1yr%). Y-axis = 10 year compound annual growth rate (10yr%). The top right corner is for growth sectors that have grown substantially both in the last year and over the last 10 years. The bottom left corner is for stagnant or slow growth sectors.  Bubble sizes indicate the relative size of each sector in terms of installed capacity.

 

Capacity Outlook, Generation Data, Policy Landscape

For a summary of policies and incentives driving the renewable power market, download the

Factsheet  Hydroelectric Power : Nigeria factsheet.


Definitions

Total energy capacity includes all forms of conventional and renewable energy sources.

Conventional Energy

Conventional energy capacity includes conventional thermal energy, nuclear power and hydro pumped storage.

Conventional thermal energy is electricity generated from an electric power plant using coal, petroleum or gas as its source of energy.

Nuclear power is electricity generated by the use of the thermal energy released from the fission of nuclear fuel in a reactor.

Hydro pumped storage is electricity generated from the kinetic energy of falling water. This water is pumped into storage reservoirs using excess power during low demand periods and then released during high demand periods.

Renewable Energy

Renewable energy capacity includes biomass and waste energy, geothermal energy, hydroelectricity, solar energy and windpower.

Non-hydro renewable energy capacity includes biomass and waste energy, geothermal energy, solar energy and windpower and excludes hydroelectricity.

Biomass and waste energy is generated from non-fossil material of biological origin constituting a renewable energy resource. Combustible renewables and waste is comprised of solid biomass, liquid biomass, biogas, industrial waste and municipal waste.

Geothermal energy is generated from hot water or steam extracted from geothermal reservoirs in the Earth's crust. Water or steam extracted from geothermal reservoirs can be used for geothermal heat pumps, water heating or electricity generation.

Hydroelectric Power is electricity generated from the kinetic energy of falling water. It does not include pumped storage hydroelectricity.

Solar energy is the radiant energy of the sun, which can be converted into other forms of energy, such as heat or electricity.

Wind energy is the kinetic energy of wind converted into mechanical energy by wind turbines (i.e. blades rotating from a hub) that drive generators to produce electricity.

Other

Installed Capacity, also known as Generator Nameplate Capacity, is the maximum rated output of a generator, prime mover, or other electric power production equipment under specific conditions designated by the manufacturer. Figures cited here are Net Summer Capacity figures which is the maximum output, commonly expressed in kilowatts (kW) or megawatts (MW), that generating equipment can supply to system load, as demonstrated by a multi-hour test, at the time of summer peak demand (period of June 1 through September 30). This output reflects a reduction in capacity due to electricity use for station service or auxiliaries.

Sources

The information contained on this website and in related publications is derived from carefully selected public sources we believe are reasonable and is subject to change without notice. Sources include the EIA, IEA, IMF, World Bank; global, regional and local trade associations, governments and a wide range of media. More detailed source lists are provided in our factsheets which can be obtained here.

The information contained on this website is NOT the latest available information we have in our databases. For more current and comprehensive analysis of the above market sector, please review our factsheets.

Renewable power numbers presented here are an aggregate of biomass + geothermal + hydroelectricity + solar + wind. Note that totals for renewable power and total power capacity for the World and the respective region may be based on estimates if actual, verifiable data is unavailable. Estimates are based on a mixture of known proposed developments, renewable power targets and extrapolations of past trends.

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